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Crozet-tracKING: At-sea GPS tracking of king penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus, from the Crozet Archipelago

This dataset has never been published

This dataset is concerned with the at-sea tracking data of king penguins, Aptenodytes patagonicus, from Crozet Islands, Baie du Marin colony, Indian Ocean. Tracking data were obtained using animal-attached GPS during the breeding season 2010/2011. This dataset is a contribution to the Retrospective Analysis of Antarctic Tracking data project of the Expert Group on Birds and Marine Mammals of the Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 24,413 records.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 24,413 records in English (197 KB) - Update frequency: unknown
Metadata as an EML file download in English (15 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (13 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Kato A, Grosbellet E, Le Vaillant M, Ropert-Coudert Y (2012) GPS tracking of king penguins from Crozet Archipelago during the austral breeding season of 2010/2011.

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

This [DATA(BASE)-NAME] is made available under the Open Data Commons Attribution License: http://www.opendatacommons.org/licenses/by/1.0/

GBIF Registration

This resource has not been registered with GBIF

Keywords

EG-BAMM; RAATD; tracking; GPS; King penguins; Aptenodytes patagonicus; Crozet

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Yan Ropert-Coudert
Researcher
Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, CNRS, UMR7178 23, rue Becquerel 67087 Strasbourg Alsace FR +33388106936

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Yan Ropert-Coudert
Researcher
Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, CNRS, UMR7178 23, rue Becquerel 67087 Strasbourg Alsace FR +33388106936

Who filled in the metadata:

Yan Ropert-Coudert
Researcher
Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, CNRS, UMR7178 23, rue Becquerel 67087 Strasbourg Alsace FR +33388106936

Who else was associated with the resource:

Principal Investigator
Yan Ropert-Coudert
Researcher
Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, CNRS, UMR7178 23, rue Becquerel 67087 Strasbourg Alsace FR +33388106936
Processor
Akiko Kato
Engineer
Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, CNRS, UMR7178 23, rue Becquerel 67087 Strasbourg Alsace FR +33388106934
Content Provider
Maryline Le Vaillant
Post-doctoral fellow
Stockholm University SE-106 91 Stockholm SE
Content Provider
Edith Grosbellet
Universite de Strasbourg 67000 Strasbourg FR

Geographic Coverage

The study was conducted in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. All birds were breeding on Possession Island in the Crozet Archipelago, at the colony of La Baie du Marin. The tracks of the birds all followed a similar pattern, initially travelling south to the polar front region (located at approximately 50°S) before heading back to the colony.

Bounding Coordinates South West [-51.2, 49.5], North East [-46.4, 53.2]

Taxonomic Coverage

Nine individuals of both sexes at the brooding stage, aged between 5 and 9 years old.

Species  Aptenodytes patagonicus (King penguins)

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 2011-01-24 / 2011-02-15

Project Data

No Description available

Title To investigate age-related foraging strategies of king penguins, initially part of the PhD project of Maryline Le Vaillant
Funding This work was part of the PhD project of Maryline Le Vaillant, and was supported by the Institut Polaire Français Paul-Emile Victor (programme 137), the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (Programme Zone Atelier de Recherches sur l’Environnement Antarctique et Subantarctique), and by grants from the Fondation Albert II de Monaco to Maryline Le Vaillant.
Study Area Description The study was carried out in the king penguin colony of 'La Grande Manchotière', in La Baie du Marin, on Possession Island, Crozet Archipelago (46°25‟S, 51°45‟E).

The personnel involved in the project:

Editor
Yan Ropert-Coudert

Sampling Methods

Deployment protocol: King penguins were captured on the beach, as they exited the colony and were about to enter the sea. Being away from the breeders, the birds could be captured rapidly, with minimal handling time and disturbance to the colony. The head of the bird was quickly covered with a hood. The devices were attached to the median line of the lower back, with marine adhesive (TESA, GmBh, Germany, reference 4651, 50m x 19mm), following the method of Wilson et al. (1997). Briefly, 4-5 strips of tesa tape were placed under a few feathers, sticky side up, a small stripe of mastic (3M scotch-seal 2229) covered the feathers onto which the device was placed. The strips of tesa were then closed onto each other so as to completely cover the device. Two small cable ties were used to secure the attachment. Several types of GPS devices were used during the project. In 2010/2011, we used either Ecotone GPS (GPS (Ecotone, Gdynia, Poland) or Cat track (Catnip technologies, USA, http://www.mr-lee-catcam.de/ct_index_en.htm) GPS. - Ecotone GPS: Seven birds were equipped with Ecotone devices. A first position fix was collected when the device was switched on, then the device entered a low-power mode until the first dive with duration at least 30 seconds. After this event, position fixes were attempted every 6 minutes while the device was out of the water (determined by a salt water switch). The devices were housed in a black heat-shrink tube, cylindrical in shape, measuring 110 x 36 mm, and weighing 97 g including battery. Once all the birds had been recaptured Once all the birds had been recaptured six devices provided reliable data (one device failed due to batteries failure). - Cat track GPS: Five birds were fitted with Cat track devices. The original batteries were replaced with a 1500 mAh, Lithium-Ion battery to extend the deployment time. Devices were programmed to acquire a fix every 2 min. Total weight of the device was 55g (with epoxy molding) and they were also inserted into a black, heat-shrink tube. All birds were recovered but only three devices provided data.

Study Extent The study was conducted in Crozet Archipelago, Indian Ocean, at the colony of La Baie du Marin on Possession Island, during the austral summer of the breeding season 2010/2011. The deployment period ranged from 24/01/2011 to 31/01/2011. Recapture period ranged from 04/02/2011 to 18/02/2011.
Quality Control Minimizing disturbance due to the logger: Externally-attached devices are known to affect the streamlining of penguins (Culik et al. 1994), which subsequently may lead to an alteration in their behaviour (e.g. the ability for king penguins to dive repeatedly at great depths, see Ropert-Coudert et al. 2000) or in their energy budgets (e.g. Ropert-Coudert et al. 2007). To reduce the extent of the effect of the GPS on the king penguins in our study, the shape of the units was made as streamlined as possible. In addition, the devices were placed in the median line of the lower back. This position is a compromise that minimizes the detrimental effect of the device (reducing drag, see Bannasch et al. 1995) while still retaining the ability for the device to emerge from the water when the bird surfaces (so as to ensure communication with satellites). The marine adhesive technique is an attachment method that preserves the integrity of the plumage and allow the users to quickly attach and remove the devices, hence minimizing the handling time and the associated stress.

Method step description:

  1. GPS tracking data contained in this dataset are raw (as downloaded from the GPS devices). No filtering or removal of corrupted positions has been done.

Bibliographic Citations

  1. Bannasch R, Wilson RP, Culik B (1994) Hydrodynamic aspects of design and attachment of a back-mounted device in penguins. Journal of Experimental Biology 194: 83-96 Bannasch et al. (1994)
  2. Culik B, Wilson R, Bannasch R (1994) Underwater swimming at low energetic cost by Pygoscelid penguins. Journal of Experimental Biology 197: 65-78 Culik et al. (1994)
  3. Ropert-Coudert Y, Bost C-A, Bevan RM, Handrich Y, Le Maho Y, Woakes AJ, Butler PJ (2000) Impact of externally-attached logger on the diving behaviour of the King penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus). Physiological and Biochemical Zoology 74: 438-444 Ropert-Coudert et al. (2000)
  4. Ropert-Coudert Y, Wilson RP, Yoda K, Kato A (2007) Assessing performance constraints in penguins with externally-attached devices. Marine Ecology-Progress Series 333: 281-289 Ropert-Coudert et al. (2007)
  5. Wilson RP, Pütz K, Peters G, Culik B, Scolaro JA, Charrassin JB, Ropert-Coudert Y (1997) Long-term attachment of transmitting and recording devices to penguins and other seabirds. Wildlife Society bulletin 25: 101-106. Wilson et al. (1997)

Additional Metadata

Purpose The present dataset is considered for inclusion in the SCAR/CCAMLR Retrospective Analysis of Antarctic Tracking Data project, coordinated by the Expert Group on Birds and Marine Mammals.