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free and open access to biodiversity data

asteroidea_southern_ocean

Latest version published by Antarctic Biodiversity Information Facility (ANTABIF) on Feb 15, 2018 Antarctic Biodiversity Information Facility (ANTABIF)

The present dataset is a compilation of georeferenced occurrences in the Southern Ocean for the asteroids (Echinodermata: Asteroidea). Occurrence data south of 45°S latitude have been mined from various sources together with information regarding the taxonomy, the sampling source and sampling sites when available. Records from 1872 to 2016 have been thoroughly checked to ensure the quality of a dataset which reaches a total of 13,840 occurrences from 4580 unique sampling events. Information regarding the reproductive strategy (brooders vs. broadcasters) of 63 species is also made available. This dataset represents the most exhaustive occurrence database on Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic asteroids.

Data Records

The data in this sampling event resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 4,580 records. 1 extension data tables also exist. An extension record supplies extra information about a core record. The number of records in each extension data table is illustrated below.

  • Event (core)
    4580
  • Occurrence 
    13840

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Downloads

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 4,580 records in English (378 KB) - Update frequency: unknown
Metadata as an EML file download in English (111 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (31 KB)

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is Antarctic Biodiversity Information Facility (ANTABIF). To the extent possible under law, the publisher has waived all rights to these data and has dedicated them to the Public Domain (CC0 1.0). Users may copy, modify, distribute and use the work, including for commercial purposes, without restriction.

GBIF Registration

This resource has not been registered with GBIF

Keywords

Asteroidea; Presence-only data; Southern Ocean; Antarctic; Sub-Antarctic; Samplingevent; Samplingevent

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Camille Moreau
Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) Avenue FD Roosevelt, 50 1000 Bruxelles BE

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Camille Moreau
Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) Avenue FD Roosevelt, 50 1000 Bruxelles BE

Who filled in the metadata:

Camille Moreau
PhD Student
Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) Avenue FD Roosevelt, 50 1000 Bruxelles BE

Who else was associated with the resource:

Author
Camille Moreau
PhD student
Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) Avenue FD Roosevelt, 50 1000 Bruxelles BE
Charlène Guillaumot
PhD student
Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) Avenue FD Roosevelt, 50 1000 Bruxelles BE
Quentin Jossart
Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) Bruxelles BE
Antonio Agüera
Post-Doc
Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) Bruxelles BE
Guillaume Crokaert
Master Student
Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) Bruxelles BE
Marc Eléaume
Researcher
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle Paris FR
Noémie Vasset
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle
Nadia Améziane
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle
Thomas Saucède
Université de Bourgogne Franche-Comté
Vladimir Laptikhovsky
Cefes / SMSG
Ania Jażdżewska
University of Lodz
Jacek Siciński
University of Lodz
Huw Griffiths
British Antarctic Survey
Katrin Linse
British Antarctic Survey
Chester Sands
British Antarctic Survey
David Barnes
British Antarctic Survey
Lenaïg Hemery
Christopher Mah
Bruno Danis
Stefano Schiaparelli

Geographic Coverage

This study focuses on the Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic regions located at latitudes south of 45°S. The Southern Ocean is a vast region characterised by the paucity of its scientific data and available collections are the compilation of several historical campaigns.

Bounding Coordinates South West [-90, -180], North East [-45, 180]

Taxonomic Coverage

All the specimens included in this dataset belong to the class Asteroidea (Echinodermata) and were identified at the species level.

Order  Paxillosida,  Valvatida,  Forcipulatida,  Velatida,  Brisingida,  Notomyotida,  Spinulosida
Family  Porcellanasteridae,  Acanthasteridae,  Odontasteridae,  Asteriidae,  Stichasteridae,  Asterinidae,  Pedicellasteridae,  Goniasteridae,  Myxasteridae,  Astropectinidae,  Freyellidae,  Benthopectinidae,  Brisingidae,  Pterasteridae,  Poraniidae,  Solasteridae,  Ctenodiscidae,  Ganeriidae,  Echinasteridae,  Heliasteridae,  Luidiidae,  Leilasteridae,  Zoroasteridae,  Ophidiasteridae,  Paulasteriidae,  Korethrasteridae,  Pseudarchasteridae,  Radiasteridae
Genus  Abyssaster,  Acanthaster,  Acodontaster,  Adelasterias,  Allostichaster,  Anasterias,  Anseropoda,  Anteliaster,  Anthenoides,  Asterina,  Asthenactis,  Astromesites,  Astropecten,  Astrostole,  Bathybiaster,  Belgicella,  Benthopecten,  Brisinga,  Brisingenes,  Caimanaster,  Calyptraster,  Ceramaster,  Cheiraster,  Chitonaster,  Chondraster,  Cladaster,  Clavaporania,  Coscinasterias,  Cosmasterias,  Crossaster,  Cryptasterias,  Ctenodiscus,  Cuenotaster,  Cycethra,  Diplasterias,  Diplodontias,  Diplopteraster,  Dipsacaster,  Dytaster,  Echinaster,  Eratosaster,  Eremicaster,  Freyastera,  Freyella,  Freyellaster,  Fromia,  Ganeria,  Gaussaster,  Gilbertaster,  Glabraster,  Granaster,  Henricia,  Hippasteria,  Hymenaster,  Hymenodiscus,  Hyphalaster,  Kampylaster,  Kenrickaster,  Labidiaster,  Leptychaster,  Lethasterias,  Lithosoma,  Lonchotaster,  Lophaster,  Luidia,  Lysasterias,  Macroptychaster,  Mediaster,  Meridiastra,  Mimastrella,  Mirastrella,  Myxoderma,  Neosmilaster,  Notasterias,  Notioceramus,  Novodinia,  Odinella,  Odontaster,  Odontohenricia,  Ophidiaster,  Paralophaster,  Paranepanthia,  Patiriella,  Paulasterias,  Pectinaster,  Pedicellaster,  Pentagonaster,  Pergamaster,  Peribolaster,  Perissasterias,  Perknaster,  Persephonaster,  Pillsburiaster,  Plutonaster,  Poraniopsis,  Porcellanaster,  Proserpinaster,  Psalidaster,  Pseudarchaster,  Pseudechinaster,  Psilaster,  Pteraster,  Radiaster,  Remaster,  Rhopiella,  Saliasterias,  Sclerasterias,  Scotiaster,  Smilasterias,  Solaster,  Sphaeriodiscus,  Stichaster,  Styracaster,  Taranuiaster,  Tarsaster,  Tremaster,  Vemaster,  Zoroaster
Species  Abyssaster diadematus,  Abyssaster planus,  Acanthaster planci,  Acodontaster capitatus,  Acodontaster conspicuus,  Acodontaster elongatus,  Acodontaster hodgsoni,  Acodontaster marginatus,  Adelasterias papillosa,  Allostichaster capensis,  Allostichaster farquhari,  Allostichaster insignis,  Allostichaster polyplax,  Anasterias antarctica,  Anasterias asterinoides,  Anasterias directa,  Anasterias laevigata,  Anasterias mawsoni,  Anasterias pedicellaris,  Anasterias perrieri,  Anasterias rupicola,  Anasterias sphoerulata,  Anasterias spirabilis,  Anasterias studeri,  Anasterias suteri,  Anseropoda antarctica,  Anteliaster australis,  Anteliaster scaber,  Anthenoides cristatus,  Asterina fimbriata,  Asthenactis australis,  Astromesites primigenius,  Astropecten brasiliensis,  Astrostole scabra,  Bathybiaster loripes,  Belgicella racowitzana,  Benthopecten munidae,  Benthopecten pedicifer,  Benthopecten pikei,  Brisinga chathamica,  Brisingenes multicostata,  Caimanaster acutus,  Calyptraster tenuissimus,  Calyptraster vitreus,  Ceramaster australis,  Ceramaster grenadensis,  Ceramaster patagonicus,  Cheiraster (Cheiraster) otagoensis,  Cheiraster (Luidiaster) antarcticus,  Cheiraster (Luidiaster) gerlachei,  Cheiraster (Luidiaster) hirsutus,  Cheiraster (Luidiaster) planeta,  Chitonaster cataphractus,  Chitonaster felli,  Chitonaster johannae,  Chitonaster trangae,  Chondraster elattosis,  Cladaster analogus,  Clavaporania fitchorum,  Coscinasterias calamaria,  Coscinasterias muricata,  Cosmasterias dyscrita,  Cosmasterias lurida,  Crossaster campbellicus,  Crossaster multispinus,  Crossaster penicillatus,  Cryptasterias brachiata,  Cryptasterias turqueti,  Ctenodiscus australis,  Ctenodiscus procurator,  Cuenotaster involutus,  Cycethra frigida,  Cycethra macquariensis,  Cycethra verrucosa,  Diplasterias brandti,  Diplasterias brucei,  Diplasterias kerguelenensis,  Diplasterias meridionalis,  Diplasterias octoradiata,  Diplasterias radiata,  Diplodontias dilatatus,  Diplodontias robustus,  Diplodontias singularis,  Diplopteraster clarki,  Diplopteraster hurleyi,  Diplopteraster otagoensis,  Diplopteraster peregrinator,  Diplopteraster semireticulatus,  Diplopteraster verrucosus,  Dipsacaster magnificus,  Dytaster felix,  Echinaster farquhari,  Echinaster smithi,  Eratosaster jenae,  Eremicaster crassus,  Eremicaster pacificus,  Eremicaster vicinus,  Freyastera benthophila,  Freyastera tuberculata,  Freyella attenuata,  Freyella drygalskii,  Freyella echinata,  Freyella formosa,  Freyella fragilissima,  Freyella giardi,  Freyella heroina,  Freyella mutabilia,  Freyellaster polycnema,  Fromia monilis,  Ganeria attenuata,  Ganeria falklandica,  Ganeria hahni,  Gaussaster antarcticus,  Gilbertaster anacanthus,  Glabraster antarctica,  Granaster nutrix,  Henricia aucklandiae,  Henricia compacta,  Henricia diffidens,  Henricia fisheri,  Henricia lukinsii,  Henricia obesa,  Henricia ornata,  Henricia pagenstecheri,  Henricia parva,  Henricia praestans,  Henricia ralphae,  Henricia simplex,  Henricia smilax,  Henricia spinulfera,  Henricia studeri,  Hippasteria falklandica,  Hippasteria phrygiana,  Hymenaster caelatus,  Hymenaster campanulatus,  Hymenaster carnosus,  Hymenaster coccinatus,  Hymenaster crucifer,  Hymenaster densus,  Hymenaster edax,  Hymenaster estcourti,  Hymenaster formosus,  Hymenaster fucatus,  Hymenaster graniferus,  Hymenaster latebrosus,  Hymenaster nobilis,  Hymenaster pellucidus,  Hymenaster perspicuus,  Hymenaster praecoquis,  Hymenaster pullatus,  Hymenaster sacculatus,  Hymenodiscus aotearoa,  Hymenodiscus distincta,  Hymenodiscus submembranacea,  Hyphalaster giganteus,  Hyphalaster inermis,  Hyphalaster scotiae,  Kampylaster incurvatus,  Kenrickaster pedicellaris,  Labidiaster annulatus,  Labidiaster radiosus,  Leptychaster flexuosus,  Leptychaster kerguelenensis,  Leptychaster magnificus,  Leptychaster melchiorensis,  Lethasterias australis,  Lithosoma novaezelandiae,  Lonchotaster tartareus,  Lophaster densus,  Lophaster gaini,  Lophaster stellans,  Lophaster tenuis,  Luidia clathrata,  Luidia porteri,  Lysasterias adeliae,  Lysasterias belgicae,  Lysasterias chirophora,  Lysasterias digitata,  Lysasterias hemiora,  Lysasterias heteractis,  Lysasterias joffrei,  Lysasterias lactea,  Lysasterias perrieri,  Macroptychaster accrescens,  Mediaster arcuatus,  Mediaster dawsoni,  Mediaster pedicellaris,  Mediaster sladeni,  Meridiastra medius,  Meridiastra oriens,  Mimastrella cognata,  Mirastrella biradialis,  Myxoderma qawashqari,  Neosmilaster georgianus,  Neosmilaster steineni,  Notasterias armata,  Notasterias bongraini,  Notasterias candicans,  Notasterias haswelli,  Notasterias pedicellaris,  Notasterias stolophora,  Notioceramus anomalus,  Novodinia novaezelandiae,  Odinella nutrix,  Odontaster aucklandensis,  Odontaster benhami,  Odontaster meridionalis,  Odontaster pearsei,  Odontaster penicillatus,  Odontaster pusillus,  Odontaster roseus,  Odontaster validus,  Odontohenricia anarea,  Odontohenricia endeavouri,  Ophidiaster confertus,  Paralophaster antarcticus,  Paralophaster godfroyi,  Paralophaster hyalinus,  Paralophaster lorioli,  Paranepanthia aucklandensis,  Patiriella regularis,  Paulasterias tyleri,  Pectinaster filholi,  Pectinaster mimicus,  Pedicellaster hypernotius,  Pentagonaster pulchellus,  Pergamaster incertus,  Pergamaster triseriatus,  Peribolaster folliculatus,  Peribolaster lictor,  Peribolaster macleani,  Perissasterias monacantha,  Perknaster antarcticus,  Perknaster aurantiacus,  Perknaster aurorae,  Perknaster charcoti,  Perknaster densus,  Perknaster fuscus,  Perknaster sladeni,  Persephonaster facetus,  Pillsburiaster aoteanus,  Pillsburiaster indutilis,  Plutonaster complexus,  Plutonaster fragilis,  Plutonaster hikurangi,  Plutonaster jonathani,  Plutonaster knoxi,  Plutonaster sirius,  Poraniopsis echinaster,  Porcellanaster ceruleus,  Proserpinaster neozelanicus,  Psalidaster fisheri,  Psalidaster mordax,  Pseudarchaster discus,  Pseudarchaster garricki,  Pseudechinaster rubens,  Psilaster acuminatus,  Psilaster charcoti,  Pteraster affinis,  Pteraster bathami,  Pteraster florifer,  Pteraster gibber,  Pteraster hirsutus,  Pteraster koehleri,  Pteraster robertsoni,  Pteraster rugatus,  Pteraster spinosissimus,  Pteraster stellifer,  Radiaster gracilis,  Remaster gourdoni,  Rhopiella hirsuta,  Saliasterias brachiata,  Sclerasterias eustyla,  Sclerasterias mollis,  Scotiaster inornatus,  Smilasterias clarkailsa,  Smilasterias irregularis,  Smilasterias scalprifera,  Smilasterias triremis,  Solaster longoi,  Solaster notophrynus,  Solaster regularis,  Solaster torulatus,  Sphaeriodiscus mirabilis,  Stichaster australis,  Styracaster armatus,  Styracaster chuni,  Styracaster horridus,  Styracaster robustus,  Taranuiaster novaezealandiae,  Tarsaster stoichodes,  Tremaster mirabilis,  Vemaster sudatlanticus,  Zoroaster actinocles,  Zoroaster alternicanthus,  Zoroaster fulgens,  Zoroaster macracantha,  Zoroaster spinulosus,  Zoroaster tenuis

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 1872-01-01 / 2016-01-01

Project Data

The present dataset is a compilation of georeferenced occurrences in the Southern Ocean for the asteroids (Echinodermata: Asteroidea). Occurrence data south of 45°S latitude have been mined from various sources together with information regarding the taxonomy, the sampling source and sampling sites when available. Records from 1872 to 2016 have been thoroughly checked to ensure the quality of a dataset which reaches a total of 13,840 occurrences from 4,580 unique sampling events. Information regarding the reproductive strategy (brooders vs. broadcasters) of 63 species is also made available. This dataset represents the most exhaustive occurrence database on Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic asteroids.

Title Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Asteroidea database
Funding The work was supported by a “Fonds pour la formation à la Recherche dans l’Industrie et l’Agriculture” (FRIA) grants to C. Moreau. This is contribution no. 16 to the vERSO project (www.versoproject.be), funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office (BELSPO, contract n°BR/132/A1/vERSO). This is contribution to the IPEV program n°1044 PROTEKER and to team SAMBA of the Biogeosciences laboratory.
Study Area Description This study focuses on the Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic regions located at latitudes south of 45°S. The Southern Ocean is a vast region characterised by the paucity of its scientific data (Griffiths et al., 2010) and available collections are the compilation of several historical campaigns. The objective of this work is to integrate the most complete database of species occurrences for the class Asteroidea in the described geographic extent.
Design Description The compilation of occurrence data of asteroid species over the extent of the Southern Ocean was realised by gathering data available from various biodiversity information systems (OBIS, GBIF, biodiversity.aq, PANGAEA https://www.pangaea.de/) as well as published literature, including original manuscripts (e.g. Gutt et al., 2014; Moles et al., 2015), data papers and cruise reports. Compiled occurrences were complemented with data from personal communications of unpublished works. This extensive dataset was developed to describe distribution patterns in the Southern Ocean as well as faunal affinities among 25 Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic bioregions (see Moreau et al., 2017). Several analytical methods such as Bootstrap Spanning Network, non-metrical multidimensional scaling (nMDS) and clustering contributed to highlight the importance of the reproductive strategy on the contemporary observed distribution patterns. The importance of environmental parameters such as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), the Polar Front (PF), the presence of gyres or the geographic distance has also been emphasised. This dataset helped better describe the different biogeographic patterns within asteroids, which are overall congruent with other taxa and differs according to species reproductive strategy. This suggests a differential influence of dispersal capabilities on species distribution patterns. Analyses at genus levels also revealed the underlying legacy of past oceanographic and geodynamic processes in present-day patterns such as the existence of a trans-Antarctic pathway that split the Antarctic continent into two entities in the past. The detailed results are available from Moreau et al., 2017.

The personnel involved in the project:

Camille Moreau

Sampling Methods

The compilation of occurrence data of asteroid species over the extent of the Southern Ocean was realised by gathering data available from various biodiversity information systems (OBIS, GBIF, biodiversity.aq, PANGAEA https://www.pangaea.de/) as well as published literature, including original manuscripts, data papers and cruise reports. Compiled occurrences were complemented with data from personal communications of unpublished works. Because of difficulties to access the Southern Ocean region, sampling effort is uneven and mainly focused on coastal areas. Sampling gears and objectives are contrasted between the different campaigns, occurring from 1872 with the HMS Challenger to 2016 with the JR15005 expedition.

Study Extent This study focuses on the Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic regions located at latitudes south of 45°S. The Southern Ocean is a vast region characterised by the paucity of its scientific data and available collections are the compilation of several historical campaigns. The objective of this work is to integrate the most complete database of species occurrences for the class Asteroidea in the described geographic extent.
Quality Control Data are available at species level. Identification and taxonomy were thoroughly checked using the Taxon Match Tool implemented in the World Register of Marine Species, to delete all potential discrepancies and update the taxonomy determination. All replicates originating from overlapping origins as well as errors regarding the georeferencing, species synonymy or misspelling were removed.

Method step description:

  1. The present dataset is a compilation of georeferenced occurrences in the Southern Ocean for the asteroids (Echinodermata: Asteroidea). Occurrence data south of 45°S latitude have been mined from various sources, corresponding to a compilation of different historical campaigns, lead from 1872 to 2016. Records have been thoroughly checked to ensure the quality of a dataset which reaches a total of 13,840 occurrences from 4,580 unique sampling events. Information on the taxonomy, the sampling source and sites are provided. The reproductive strategy (brooders vs. broadcasters), playing a key role in the Southern Ocean, is given for 63 species out of the 299 mined. This dataset represents the most exhaustive occurrence database on Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic asteroids.

Additional Metadata

marine, harvested by iOBIS The dataset was used in the following publications: Moreau, C., Saucede, T., Jossart, Q., Agüera, A., Brayard, A., & Danis, B. (2017). Reproductive strategy as a piece of the biogeographic puzzle: a case study using Antarctic sea stars (Echinodermata, Asteroidea). Journal of Biogeography, 44(4), 848-860. DOI: 10.1111/jbi.12965 Moreau, C. V., Aguera, A., Jossart, Q., & Danis, B. (2015). Southern Ocean Asteroidea: a proposed update for the Register of Antarctic Marine Species. Biodiversity data journal, (3). DOI: 10.3897/BDJ.3.e7062 Jossart, Q., Moreau, C., Agüera, A., De Broyer, C., & Danis, B. (2015). The Register of Antarctic Marine Species (RAMS): a ten-year appraisal. ZooKeys, (524), 137. DOI: 10.3897/zookeys.524.6091

Purpose The dataset “Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Asteroidea database” reporting sampling events presences of species around the Southern Ocean is the result of a thorough work of information mining from a very wide range of sources, from biodiversity information systems (e.g. GBIF; OBIS) to personal communication and through a broad range of literature sources (original manuscripts, data papers and cruise reports). This dataset was created as a part of the wider projects vERSO and RECTO which aim to better understand ecosystems and their responses to global change in the Southern Ocean. This dataset has recently been used in a study published in Journal of Biogeography to describe and analyse asteroid biogeographical patterns in the Southern Ocean with a particular focus on the effect of reproductive strategy on the observed distribution patterns (see Moreau et al., 2017). The dataset also allowed an update for the Register of Antarctic Marine Species (see Moreau et al., 2015). Upcoming genetic work will also be coupled to this dataset in order to compare biogeographical and phylogeographical patterns and give a better resolution regarding the underlying role of historical factors. Finally, this dataset is currently being used to create spatially-explicit models for keystone species in ecosystems strongly challenged by global change in the Southern Ocean.
Alternative Identifiers http://ipt.biodiversity.aq/resource?r=asteroidea_southern_ocean